Monthly Archives: October 2016

Tips to Protect Yourself From Medical Identity Theft

What is medical identity theft? In this serious and growing problem, someone else uses your personal information to obtain medical goods or services. Medical identity theft affects consumers, health care providers, and insurance organization. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), medical identity theft accounts for about 3 percent of all identity theft, and the World Privacy Forum claims it’s the most difficult form of identity theft to correct.

When you are the victim of medical identity theft, incorrect information about diagnoses and treatments may appear on your medical records, potentially affecting your health care providers’ decisions about your care and treatment. Also, in addition to paying for treatment you didn’t receive, in some cases you might be denied treatment or coverage because of fraudulent medical or insurance information.

But there is some good news: HIPAA (the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) regulations and the Identity Theft Protection Act, already in place, give you many of the tools you need to get errors corrected at your doctor’s office and with your insurance provider. Of course, like any crime, you’re better off preventing it from happening in the first place.

Spotting Medical Identity Theft

Among other signs, the FTC states that you may be a target of a potential medical identity theft or fraud if you are charged for medical services you didn’t receive. Keep a calendar to track your appointments, treatment dates, and any hospital admission and discharge dates. If the explanation of benefits from your insurance provider or Medicare isn’t exactly right, clear up the error as soon as possible.

Medical receipts, prescription drug information, health insurance forms, and any documents bearing your health care providers’ names might be all a clever thief needs to begin off-loading other medical claims to you. If you don’t need to keep medical documents, shred or burn them, and peel off labels from your prescription medications before recycling the containers.

Legal Protection to Combat Medical Identity Theft

The Identity Theft Protection Act of 2005 requires any commercial, charitable, educational, or non-profit organization that acquires or uses sensitive personal data to provide significant administrative, technical, and physical safeguards to prevent that data from being mishandled.

The same act that allows consumers to place a freeze on their credit reports also requires any covered entity to investigate suspected misappropriation of personal medical data and to do everything possible to correct resulting inaccurate medical information and billing problems.

Tips to Prevent Medical Identity Theft

Take your photo ID to all doctor appointments. Bring an ID along with your insurance information and any other documents, such as a Medicare card, so you can provide it. An FTC law known as the “red flags rule” encourages doctors and other health care providers to require proof of identity before providing services. You can write “See ID” on the signature line of your Medicare card, just as you can on a credit card, so your health care provider will be prompted to verify your identity. Also, when you’re asked to sign any paper at your doctor’s office, review the document first and be sure any erroneous information is corrected immediately.
Don’t divulge medical or insurance information too freely. Sometimes you’re smart to be suspicious, especially of someone contacting you by phone. If you get a caller asking you to take a health care survey and requesting your health care provider’s name or your insurance information, hang up, and then call to alert your insurance provider. Also, be suspicious of health care providers and equipment suppliers who use telemarketing or door-to-door sales tactics, put the wrong diagnosis on a claim “so Medicare will pay,” or advertise free medical consultations for people with Medicare.
Report any ID card loss immediately. If you lose your Medicare card or suspect it may have been stolen, call Social Security to get a replacement. Likewise, if you lose your insurance card, let your provider know right away.
Review all of your insurance documents. Insurance information and statements of benefits can be confusing, and medical identity thieves know that many people don’t read them carefully. However, these documents are one of the first alerts that you may be a victim of medical identity theft. Read your statements and if they don’t seem right, call your insurer’s office. Before you call, verify that the phone number on the documents you have matches the one on your insurance card.
Monitor Your Privacy and Your Health

Most people realize that maintaining good health — managing weight and keeping the body strong and mind active — means making an effort every day. Avoiding medical identity theft doesn’t require daily vigilance, but in order to avoid problems, you should perform regular “check-ups” to be sure no one is posing as you. Be sure to monitor your insurance provider’s regular statements. Although you can also request a complete copy of your medical records from your health care provider, it can be expensive — ask about the cost before you formally request it.

Checkups Are Vital

When you were little, your parents probably made sure you had an annual checkup with your doctor. But as you’ve grown older, you may have gotten out of this habit.

Health professionals stress that these regular exams are important to help identify risk factors and problems before they become serious. If diseases are caught early, treatments are usually much more effective. Ultimately, having a regular doctor’s visit will help you live a long and healthy life.

Doctor’s Visit: The Prevention Checkup

Depending on your age, sex, and family medical history, a checkup with your doctor may include:

Blood, urine, vision, and hearing tests to evaluate your overall health
Assessments of your blood pressure, cholesterol level, and weight
A discussion about your diet and exercise habits and any tobacco, drug, and alcohol use
Immunizations and booster shots
Screenings to assess your risk of developing certain diseases, including diabetes (if you already have high blood pressure or high cholesterol) and cancer
Depending on your age and sexual lifestyle, testing for STDs and possibly HIV
Starting at age 50, or younger if you have a family history, a screening test for colorectal cancer
A discussion about depression and stress to evaluate your mental health
Doctor’s Visit: Concerns for Men

For men, in addition to checking weight, high blood pressure, and other basics, your doctor’s visit may specifically include:

Starting at age 50, or younger if you have a family history, a rectal exam to check for abnormal bumps in the prostate and a prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood test to screen for prostate cancer
Between the ages of 65 and 75 if you have ever smoked cigarettes, an abdominal exam to check for an enlargement in your aorta; an abdominal aortic aneurysm, a weakness in the lining of the aorta (a large blood vessel in your chest and abdomen), can develop with age and become a life-threatening problem.
Doctor’s Visit: Concerns for Women

For women, in addition to checking weight, high blood pressure, and other basics, your doctor’s visit may specifically include:

A test for cervical cancer, called a Pap smear, every one to three years
A clinical breast exam to check for any unusual lumps or bumps in your breasts
Starting at age 40 (or younger if you have a strong family history for breast cancer), a breast cancer screening with a mammogram every one to two years
Starting at age 65, a referral for a bone density test to screen for osteoporosis, the disease that causes brittle, fragile bones and typically affects older women; women with more than one risk factor for osteoporosis may start earlier
Doctor’s Visit: Preparation

It’s important for you to play an active role to get the most out of your doctor’s visit. Before your exam, review and update your family health history, be prepared to ask if you’re due for any general screenings or vaccinations, and come up with a list of questions if you have particular health concerns.

During your actual doctor’s visit, don’t be shy about getting your questions answered. Also, if your doctor gives you advice about specific health issues, don’t hesitate to take notes. Time is often limited during these exams, but by coming prepared you’re sure to get the most out of your checkup.

Information About Nausea

A person with nausea has the sensation that he or she might vomit. Nausea always occurs before vomiting. Nausea is a common symptom that may accompany many diseases and conditions. Common causes of nausea include drug side effects, food poisoning, motion sickness, pregnancy, and drinking too much alcohol. Nausea commonly occurs in those with infections ranging from influenza to gastroenteritis. In general, vomiting is more worrisome than nausea alone.

Nausea Symptoms

The most common symptom that occurs with nausea is vomiting. Symptoms that are commonly associated with nausea include dizziness, faintness, dry mouth, diarrhea, fever, abdominal pain, and decreased urination. Serous symptoms that may accompany nausea include chest pain, confusion, lethargy, rapid pulse, breathing difficulty, excessive sweating, and fainting.

Nausea Treatment
Treatment for nausea depends on the underlying cause. In most cases, nausea resolves by itself. Treatment may include plenty of fluids and a clear liquid diet. Severe nausea may require treatment with medications.